no-fee balance transfer credit cardsWhile this information was accurate at the time this post was published, these cards’ offers and perks may have expired or changed over time. Visit our reviews of the best credit cards to find the right card for your needs.

Balance transfers are a great way to save money while you pay down a credit card balance because they allow you to avoid interest for a set period of time. That said, if you’re not using the right credit card, this strategy could end up backfiring and costing you money in the long run. For example, those who pick a card with a short 0% intro APR period might end up with a balance and high interest rates when the 0% intro APR expires. Another situation that might wind up costing you more than you save is choosing a card with a high balance transfer fee. Fortunately, while most balance transfer credit cards charge a 3% to 5% balance transfer fee, there are a few cards that allow you to avoid paying a fee altogether, which means even more money in your pocket over the long run! Not sure which no-fee balance transfer credit cards are the best? Keep reading to see our top picks.

The Amex EveryDay Credit Card from American Express

The Amex EveryDay Credit Card from American Express (a NextAdvisor advertiser) is our top-rated balance transfer credit card because it not only offers impressive balance transfer benefits, but it also earns rewards on purchases, which means it’s a card you’ll likely want to keep in your wallet long after the 0% intro APR expires. Kicking things off is a 15-month 0% intro APR on balance transfers requested in the first 60 days and a $0 balance transfers fee on transfers made in the same 60-day period. Additionally, there is a 15-month 0% intro APR on purchases (then it’s 14.49% to 25.49% variable) and no annual fee. In terms of rewards, you’ll get a 10,000-point bonus after spending $1,000 on purchases in the first 3 months — that bonus is equal to $100 in travel through American Express Travel. Cardholders will also earn 2 points per $1 spent at U.S. supermarkets (up to $6,000/year in purchases, then it’s 1 point per $1) as well as 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases. What’s more, if you use your card to make 20 purchases or more in a billing cycle, you’ll get 20% more points on those purchases. Points earned with the Amex EveryDay Credit Card from American Express can be redeemed for travel through American Express Travel, entertainment, dining, merchandise and online shopping. Rounding out the card are a number of American Express cardholder perks, including travel accident insurance, car rental insurance, purchase protection and more. It should also be noted that the Amex EveryDay Credit Card from American Express is available to those with good to excellent credit (usually a credit score of 700 or higher).

Chase Slate

If you’d prefer a straightforward balance transfer credit card that doesn’t earn any rewards, the Chase Slate is for you. This card makes things easy with a 15-month 0% intro APR on balance transfers and purchases. Similar to the previously mentioned cards, you’ll pay a $0 balance transfer fee on transfers made in the first 60 days of account opening (after that, it’s 5% or $5, whichever is greater). Chase Slate has no annual fee and no penalty APR. It’s also available to those with good credit (usually considered a credit score around 700), and it provides cardholders with free monthly Experian FICO credit scores.

Getting the most from a balance transfer really depends on the card you use. If you want to be sure one of the cards listed above is right for you, use our free Balance Transfer Calculator, which allows you to input your transfer amount, monthly payment and credit level to see which card will save you the most money. Also, check out our balance transfer credit card reviews to see how the best no-fee balance transfer credit cards compare to other cards on the market.

Disclaimer: This content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuer. This content was accurate at the time of this post, but card terms and conditions may change at any time. This site may be compensated through the credit card issuer Affiliate Program.