3 Best Credit Cards for Paying Off DebtWhile this information was accurate at the time this post was published, these cards’ offers and perks may have expired or changed over time. Visit our reviews of the best credit cards to find the right card for your needs.

Are you carrying debt on a credit card? Did you know there’s a way for you to rid yourself of that debt without paying an arm and leg in interest? By opening a card with a long 0% intro APR on balance transfers and transferring your balance over to the new card, you can pay off your debt without paying a dime of interest. Just make sure the balance is paid off before the 0% intro APR expires to completely avoid any interest charges. Picking the right card for your balance transfer isn’t always easy, but if you keep reading, you can see our picks for the 3 best credit cards for paying off debt.

Wells Fargo Platinum Visa card

3 Best Credit Cards for Paying Off DebtPrefer a card with a long 0% intro APR, no annual fee and a unique added perk? If so, you’ll want the Wells Fargo Platinum Visa card in your pocket. That’s because the card not only offers an 18-month 0% intro APR on balance transfers, but it also has a reasonable 3% intro balance transfer fee for 120 days, then it’s 5%. Cardholders will also appreciate that the 18-month 0% intro APR also applies to purchases. This card also has no annual fee, provides cardholders with free FICO scores and is available to those with good to excellent credit (usually considered a credit score of 700 or higher). On top of that, cardholders who use their Wells Fargo Platinum Visa card to pay their monthly cell phone bill will receive up to $600 in mobile protection against covered damage and theft (with a $25 deductible per claim and a maximum of 2 claims per year).

Citi Double Cash Card

3 Best Credit Cards for Paying Off DebtThe Citi Double Cash Card (a NextAdvisor advertiser) is one of our picks for a number of reasons. First, it offers an 18-month 0% intro APR on balance transfers, giving you ample time to pay down any debts you transfer. The card charges a 3% balance transfer fee ($5 minimum), but this one-time fee is likely a lot lower than the ongoing interest you’re paying on your current credit card. There is no 0% intro APR on purchases, but if you’re planning to transfer a balance, that shouldn’t matter too much. Next, the card earns 2% cash back on all purchases in a unique way. Here’s how it works: cardholders earn 1% when they make a purchase and another 1% when they pay for that purchase. Although balance transfers do not earn cash back, these rewards offer a great reason to keep the card in your wallet long after the 0% intro APR expires. On top of all of that, the Citi Double Cash Card has no annual fee and provides cardholders with a number of added perks, including travel insurance, car rental insurance and more.

Chase Freedom Unlimited

3 Best Credit Cards for Paying Off DebtIf you want a straightforward cash back credit card with a long 0% intro APR period, Chase Freedom Unlimited is perfect for you. Kicking things off is a 15-month 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers! You’ll pay a 3% balance transfer fee (with a $5 minimum), but this one-time fee is worth paying when you consider your current credit card’s interest rate. Next, you’ll earn 3% cash back for the first year (up to $20,000 spent) — that’s up to $600 cash back! After that, you’ll earn an unlimited 1.5% cash back on all purchases, which means you don’t have to worry about rotating categories or spending caps. Other perks of Chase Freedom Unlimited, a card that’s available to those with good to excellent credit (often considered a credit score of 700 or higher), include no annual fee and free access to your FICO score, updated every month.

If you’re carrying debt, it often feels like you’re trapped with no way out of paying your high interest. Luckily, by opting for one of the cards noted in this post, you can pay off your debt interest free! Visit our reviews of the best low APR credit cards to see how the three cards listed in this post compare to others on the market.

Disclaimer: This content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuer. This content was accurate at the time of this post, but card terms and conditions may change at any time. This site may be compensated through the credit card issuer Affiliate Program.