Finding out ones genealogy is difficult. Searching through seemingly endless amounts of photos, documents and records can only get you so far into your families heritage. What if there was a way to go beyond papers, documents and historical records helping you to find what makes you you?

With recent advances in technology, DNA testing has quickly become one of the fastest and most in-depth ways of finding out your family's lineage. Through tracing common genes in your DNA and comparing them to millions of other genotypes across the world, Ancestry.com has made it possible to see exactly where your family is from and the journey they embarked on that eventually lead to you.

You might be wondering how exactly the DNA test works. There are a few different options to choose from. You can choose a DNA without a subscription to the Ancestry.com service, a DNA test with a subscription to U.S. discovery service or a DNA test with World explorer. Once you choose an option, Ancestry.com will ship you a test kit. The test kit has a small mouth swab which you wipe on the inside of your mouth. After swabbing you ship the sample back to Ancestry.com for processing. From there, Ancestry.com uses autosomal DNA testing to compare your unique DNA signature to the DNA of people all over the world, finding the common strains that help determine your ancestry and where your ancestors once lived. After the DNA is analyzed Ancestry.com helps you to trace your family line beyond the paper trail and connect you with relatives all over the world. As the Ancestry data base grow, they will continue to update you and help you to further expand your family tree.

Though the DNA testing is a little bit pricey, starting at $199 without a subscription, it's a great way to find out more about yourself, where you come from and where your family has been. If you're interested in finding out more about Ancestry.com, check out our full review on the service as well as other Genealogy sites that may help you in discovering your families history.

Genealogy